Affiliated Faculty


CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC

CDRC


Julie Bargmann

Julie Bargmann is internationally recognized as an innovative designer in building regenerative landscapes and with interdisciplinary design education. At University of Virginia, her  investigative graduate design studios and seminars challenge restrictive policies and conventional remediation practices that plague Superfund sites and Brownfields. Bargmann teaches critical site-seeing as a means to reveal multiple site histories, giving legible form to complex processes, offering renewed relationships for communities in tired and toxic surroundings.  From closed quarries to abandoned coal mines, fallow factories and urban railyards, Bargmann joins teams of architects, artists, engineers, historians and scientists to imagine the next evolution of these working landscapes.


Anselmo Canfora

Anselmo joined the faculty at the University of Virginia, School of Architecture the fall 2004. In 2007, Anselmo founded Initiative reCOVER, a research project established to assist disaster recovery efforts and underserved populations through partnerships with humanitarian, community-based organizations, professional firms and manufacturers. Initiative reCOVER promotes a collaborative entrepreneurial interdisciplinary spirit in service of hands-on, design-build learning experiences, and the advancement of building technologies, methods, and materials.


Phoebe Crisman

Phoebe Crisman teaches design studios and lectures on architectural theory, urbanism and sustainability. In her teaching, research and practice, Crisman focuses on the design of sustainable relationships between specific cultures and built environments. Working in overlooked places and with people underserved by design, she has developed a model of engaged design research to test abstract ideas and create more sustainable communities. Crisman has extended this research to the international context through her India Initiative research and teaching, which focuses on the specific challenges and opportunites found in the emerging megacities and enduring villages of the Indian subcontinent.


Melissa Goldman

From crafting the tools and materials for robotic extrusion to designing and building gigantic moving creatures, Melissa has an excitement for making at all scales.  Her work combines an interest in exploiting material properties, hacking tools, and playing with robots, CNC routers, and 3D printers, and she teaches seminars on materials and digital fabrication tools and techniques.  She joined UVa in 2011, and is in charge of SARC Shops, including the Milton Air Field Hangar facility, and mentors a crew of Shop TAs who teach a series of Shops Short Courses open to all in the University. Her work connects her to other makers across Grounds, Charlottesville, and beyond, collaborating with multiple departments and professional fabricators.


Seth McDowell

McDowell’s design projects imagine alternate futures, rooted in chimerical science.  This work is positioned to disrupt the logics of science, technology, optimization and aesthetics. Seth McDowell is leading a group of UVA architecture students in a community engagement project for the rural, Appalachian town of Grundy, Virginia.  Here, students are collaborating with Grundy stakeholders and youth to design, program and build a new, public Youth Center—replacing a former facility that was demolished due to a flood-proofing project.  This work began in the summer of 2013 with support from the Appalachian Prosperity Project and will continue through summer of 2014 with support from the Jefferson Public Citizens.


Jeana Ripple

Jeana Ripple came to UVa from professional practice in Chicago where she was a designer at Studio Gang Architects. Ripple teaches Advanced Parametric Structures, graduate foundation studios, and the Design-Driven Manufacturing undergraduate research studio. She is a founder and lead investigator of the Design-Driven Manufacturing program at the University of Virginia together with economic development expert, Prof. Suzanne Moomaw. Ripple is also a principal investigator in collaborative research with biomedical engineering focused on visualization of complex data systems.


William Sherman

William Sherman is a Professor of Architecture, an Associate Vice President for Research, and the Founding Director of the OpenGrounds initiative of the University of Virginia. As an architect and educator, his teaching and design research examine dynamic cultural and environmental processes in architectural design, ranging in scale from human physiology to global energy flows. Having completed terms as Associate Dean for Academics and the Chair of the Department of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, he teaches studios and courses ranging in focus from sustainable buildings and cities to the design of spaces that encourage the teaching and practice of innovation across disciplinary boundaries.


Nancy Takahashi

Nancy Takahashi teaches First-Year Foundation Studios and EcoTech (ecology + technology) courses in the Department of Landscape Architecture. Takahashi is examining the historic fishing town of Winneba Ghana with a team of Architecture School students and colleagues from the University of Ghana Legon and University of Sheffield Hallam. Last summer, the team traveled to Ghana to meet town officials and gather climate change related site data: vegetation, coast line, historic sacred sites, and water systems.  This summer the team will convene at the School of Architecture to document their findings, and explore the implications of sea level rise on this community in terms of its economic, tourist, environmental, and sacred cultural future.


Peter Waldman

Since the 1970s, Peter Waldman has been an architect and educator teaching first at Princeton, then at Rice University and currently at the University of Virginia, where he is now firmly grounded in the Piedmont condition. His extensive residential practice has been concerned with the Climatic House constructed according to Specifications for Construction executed by Nomads, Surveyors and Lunatics. His fables of the Gardener and the Engineer manifest his profound respect for the spirit and resources of the renewable American urban condition.


Alex Wall

Alex Wall received his Diploma at the Architectural Association, London. He is a former Professor of Urban Design at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany. He has been a partner of UMnet, where together with `asp` Stuttgart, he has won several national and international design and planning competitions.


Barbara Brown Wilson

Barbara Brown Wilson’s research and teaching focus on the ethics, theory, and practice of sustainable development, community engaged design, and the history of urban social movements. Her research is often change-oriented—she collaborates with real community partners to identify opportunities for engaged and integrated sustainable development. She co-founded the Design Futures Student Leadership Forum, which includes a consortium of ten universities working to elevate the educational realms of PID, and founded the University of Texas Public Interest Design summer program, which brings in top students from around the country to work with community partners on complex urban issues.

The Community Design and Research Center